I, The North

As the only single woman at work (there are eight employees at my main place of business and four at my second job), I am the one with by far the most active social life. My coworkers ask frequently about the dates I mention and try to set me up with their single friends (no thanks). My queer coworker will take me out to lesbian dance nights and play wingwoman (to moderate success); one met her boyfriend on Tinder and is a hopeless romantic about it; the rest have been in long term relationships since the dawn of time and have forgotten about the beginning stages of modern courtship.

I’d been chatting to a fellow on Tinder about my love of basketball (one of my pictures is of me looking quite buxom in my hometeam jersey) and he invited me to join him for a game a week later. (Note: one upcoming post will be about my experience with NBA players on Tinder. You’ll love it)

Now, a few of my friends have suggested that, since I lost my share in season tickets when Harold and I broke up, that I should get guys from Tinder to take me to as many games as possible. As a girl who always insists on paying her own way, this seemed especially sketchy.

That said, I accepted this dude’s offer because the Tinder banter had been excellent and he said his employer had corporate seats. We picked a game (not against a great team but one with a star point guard, which reveals my preference for three-point shots) and he confirmed the next day that he had acquired a set of tickets. His pictures weren’t especially detailed – a group shot, a low-light guitar pic, a skydiving one – but he gave off cute vibes.

I told my coworkers about my upcoming date and they laughed and cheered me on. It was the day that I confronted Catch, though, so I wasn’t putting too much stock in anything. I certainly wasn’t my usual flirty self. When a customer came in to pick up his usual order (which he does every three months – in my industry, we’d call him a regular) I barely looked at him. He gave me his name (common) and I swiped his card. It was a typical transaction but my mind wasn’t on work.

I check my phone an hour later to find a text message from the guy who was supposed to take me to the game.

“Hey – what are the odds of you working at __________ and cashing me out just now?” I confirmed that it had been me and we briefly discussed the ethics of me going on a date with a client (if I were higher-ranking, I’d excuse myself… but I’m not).

I ran to tell my coworkers, who howled with laughter. This could only happen to me, they said. One coworker exclaimed that he is one of our best-looking customers.

Game Day fast approached and I was super psyched to watch my team play! Oh, and I guess to meet this guy. That was secondary and I felt weird about it. I texted him the day before to ask him about his day and he said he had to bail due to a last-minute work function.

I pouted and was annoyed – I hadn’t bought a ticket for myself and now all the inexpensive ones had been sold. I complained on social media and my friend (the lovely woman with whom I road tripped to Montreal) offered me hers (she’s a season seat holder and her seats are AMAZING). There was a condition (I had to heckle a player whom she knew from university) but I was happy to do it.

I went by myself and had an amazing time. I’d go out on a limb and say it was the best non-playoff game I’d ever seen. Better than any game with Harold; better than any out-of-town game; I felt so liberated because I didn’t have to share it with anyone. I could cheer on my favourite scrub player (he saw a whole minute of play!) I could hyperbolically applaud the dance team, especially the captain who is the number one exception to my “No Moms” rule. I could rap along with the pump up songs and didn’t have to share my Sprite. I had more in common with the strangers in our colour-coordinated promotional tee shirts than I have with anyone I’ve met up with in a long time.

I guess I kind of am taking that game as a metaphor right now. There are a lot of things I used to share with people I’ve dated, but I think right now I’m better off keeping them to myself, at least until I have someone special enough to appreciate it.

It’s not as much fun for my coworkers, but they’ll live.

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